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The Spanish Ghost Towns Left By the 2008 Financial Crisis – ANITH
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The Spanish Ghost Towns Left By the 2008 Financial Crisis

The Spanish Ghost Towns Left By the 2008 Financial Crisis

This sprawling housing development in Buniel, Spain was abandoned in the summer of 2008 after its construction company declared bankruptcy.

Out of the 1,400 planned houses in this development in Buniel, Spain, only 312 were under construction before the development company went bankrupt.

Photographer Markel Redondo used a drone to take aerial photography of abandoned housing developments like this one in Buniel, Spain.

These Mediterranean-style villas in Costa Blanca, Spain are part of a housing development that was abandoned in 2008 during the Spanish real estate bust.

The Golden Sun Beach and Golf Resort in Pulpi, Spain was abandoned in 2010.

The Ciudad Jardín Soto Real development in Buniel, Spain was abandoned in 2008.

The Golden Sun Beach and Golf Resort in Pulpi, Spain featured sea views, gardens, swimming pools, and two golf courses. It has stood empty since 2010.

The La Tercia Real development in La Tercia, Spain was inspired by old Spanish villages.

La Tercia Real was intended as a gated community for wealthy foreigners, but never opened.

This development in Villamayor de Calatrava, Spain was meant to encompass 655 houses, along with an equestrian school, golf course, and hotel/spa.

This housing development in Aragon, Spain aimed to add 9,000 people to a town with only 3,000 inhabitants. It was abandoned by its bankrupt developer in 2009.

This development in Villamayor de Calatrava, Spain was abandoned by its developer during the 2008 Spanish housing bust.

The Playa Macenas Beach and Golf Resort in Mojacar, Spain was intended to include 1,395 houses. Construction had only begun on a few of the homes when the development was abandoned in 2008.

The Fortuna Hill Golf Resort in Fortuna, Spain was built to house 11,212 people but was never completed.

If completed, the Fortuna Hill Golf Resort would have nearly doubled the population of Fortuna, Spain.

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Anith Gopal
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